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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 133 (some duplicates have been removed)
pakistan and india were at a nadir. coins and with 9/11 and the subsequent bond process, a pakistani base -- terrorist group had conducted a large- scale terrorist attack on the indian parliament. the countries were close to war. very close to war. the idea that they would collaborate in some joint venture in afghanistan was more difficult to conceive then that might be now. relations have to some degree improved. i do not think that india and pakistan between them would be able to substitute for the kind of assistance -- [indiscernible] for some time to come. to the extent the country's -- countries could agree on some form of joint collaboration, i would not oppose it. but neither would i look to it to shoulder much of the load in the short to medium term. >> from rote. -- front row. >> i write the mitchell reports and also councilmember. fassel -- i wanted to ask the ambassador about his observations about cost and risk. and to do that in the context of american domestic political setting, just to say that 2014 is not just another year. it is midterms. i wonder if there is a way, if yo
as a result of what's in the bill and what's not. >> brown: then, new killings in pakistan, we look at the uptick in violence against aid workers and women teachers with "washington post" foreign affairs reporter pam constable. >> woodruff: paul solman takes us inside a company that turns a profit by employing an unusual workforce. >> a massachusetts manufacturing firm founded in 1932 where the median age is 74 and rosa finnegan over there, is 100. >> brown: and ray suarez talks with journalist and author claudia kolker about what she calls "the immigrant advantage." >> i began to ask foreign-born people what i call the question: what's the smartest thing that people did in your home country that you want to hang on to while you're here and the rest of us ought to copy? >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from view
": the targeting of pakistan aid workers; the value of seniors in the workforce and the "immigrant advantage." but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street started the year with a bang, as the fiscal cliff deal put an end to fears of sweeping tax hikes and spending cuts. the dow jones industrial average surged 308 points to close at 13,412-- its biggest gain in a year. the nasdaq rose more than 92 points to close at 3,112. the civil war in syria yielded grim new numbers today. the u.n. human rights office reported the number of dead has risen sharply over previous figures. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of "independent television news." some of the images may be disturbing. >> truly shocking. the words of the u.n. officials. syrians need no persuading of that. today, at least another 30 or so added to the death list. somebody fired into the petrol station. they'd have none here for four days. news was spreading fast that respliefs happening and the place was crowded. vulnerable human bodies... metal, concrete, fire, and high explosive.
-- afghanistan, pakistan, yemen and somalia. it's estimated that the cia and the united states military have undertaken more than three hundred drone strikes and killed about 2500 people. it's clear we have yet to understand the full impact of the country's drone war. one former obama security adviser calls the use of drone counterproductive. use of drones counterproductive, that is. and retired general stanley mcchrystal who championed use of drones in afghanistan is now advising caution. he says what scares me about the drone strikes is how they are perceived around the world. the resentment created by the use of american unmanned strikes is much greater than the average american anticipates and appreciates. they are hated on a visceral level, even by people who have never seen one or seen the everythings of one. yet earlier this week, the president nominated a man widely viewed as the administration's drone warrior to head the cia. obama counterterrorism adviser john brennan has made the legal case for targeted killings. some are now expressing concern over brennan in charge of the cia. a
. >>> overseas in pakistan this morning, pakistan officials say a pair of u.s. drone strikes kill 13d people. it's reported but not confirm thad among the dead is a senior taliban commander. meanwhile a federal judge has ruled that president obama does not have to rule the justification for drone attacks against terrorists. it was about the highly classified targeted killings program. the suit followed a drone strike that killed a leader anwar al awlaki. >>> there's a new death count in the syrian civil war. the u.n. says more than 60,000 people have been killed in the 21 months since the uprising began. yesterday a syrian jet bombed a gas station in a damascus suburb. dozens were reportedly killed. >>> an american journalist is missing in syria. james foley was working when he disappeared. he was abducted by unknown gunmen on thanksgiving day. two years ago he was held by gunman in libya for six weeks. we'll take a break on this thursday. when we come back, a final tune. we'll remember '50s pop star patty page and her memorable songs. this is "morning news." nof splenda sweeteners, discover nec
drastically increased the use of predator drones. 329 targeted strikes have taken place in pakistan since 2004, but the vast majority have taken place since 2009. although opposition to the president's use of drones has remained largely silent, that seems to be changing. two days ago in hawaii protesters paraded signs close to where the first family was vacationing, which read drones kill kids and is it really okay if obama does it? last week a federal judge ruled the administration did not need to disclose internal communications about the drone program. the "new york times" and the aclu had filed requests in 2011 for the legal justification of these targeted killings, including the drone strike that killed anwar al alaki, an american citizen living in yemen. the white house denied that request for purposes of national security. the judge approved the administration's right to keep that information classified, but still questioned the drone program, writing, "i can find no way around the thicket of laws and precedents that effectively allow the executive brarchg of our government to proclaim
india and pakistan have a fear that what will have been, still inside pakistan, where they will go because pakistan is also among other nations. but reality can you give to those working in afghanistan? >> i think what we have to look at then is we have to rest comfortable with that list then, chicago, tokyo come in the international community has a huge commitment and frankly when we look at $16 billion of international commitment, it can, i don't think afghanistan is going to be standing alone. we'd like them to stand up, but again we need to be there. the >> can you review the bidding on what his profile at the insurgency today, roughly how many taliban either? how many al qaeda -- what are your best estimates and the breakdown between the hard-core click >> that it's a very difficult question. part of it deals with the nature of how things in the inning out of afghanistan for certain. i've seen numbers quite honestly as low as 20,000 insurgents and with the afghan partners around 30. the exact percentage of what's hard-core and what's not is very hard to break apart. i think th
leader was among 13 killed in two u.s. drone strikes in pakistan jenna: right now a murder trial is going on in arizona for a woman who admitted, admitted to murdering her boyfriend. now she has changed her story a few times. first, she insisted she didn't do it. she would never do something like that. then she said she did kill him, and it was self-defense. rick folbaum has latest on this story, rick? >> you get a sense where this trial is going to go hearing the defense attorney's opening argument. she told the jury flat-out that jodi arias killed her former boyfriend but says arias was forced to kill him and the defense's case will explain why. travis alexander was found dead back in 2008, five days after jodi arias shot him in the face, stabbed him 27 times and slit his throat. she certainly left nothing to chance but her lawyer says she only did it because alexander was an abusive sexual deviant. >> had joe di not been forced to defend herself, none of us would be here. in that one minute had jodi not chosen to defend herself, she would not be here. >> reporter: the prosecutor saying
-awlaki was taken out bay drone strike in september of 2011 in yemen. america's use of drone in pakistan, has obviously increased substantially under president obama. we are getting word of senior taliban commander was killed in a strike tuesday in pakistan northwest territory. drone strike. guantanamo bay detension facility that is open and the resigning of fisa, all bush era war on terror programs that continued or expanded and now rendition. >> new case is raising questions about the detention policy. >> arrested in augustover seas in jabuti. training for one suspects a the men were held in secret, interrogated by the authorities and u.s. agents. detention only became public when the documents were unveiled in december and the me briefly appeared in a brooklyn court. >> appropriate venue is not to take somebody involved in a civil war in east africa and bring them to the eastern district of new york. to be prosecuted in a control court. >> he says there is no evidence that the client who admits he is a member committed crime against the u.s. citing a thin indictment that has conspiracy to
governments recommit to dialogue as the right way forward on this. that's what we support. >> the pakistan form minister still in new york, if anyone had a talk with her? >> i think i mentioned yesterday that her senior meeting with u.s. government officials was with ambassador rice at the u.n. yesterday so i'll refer you to u.s.-u.n. for a readout on that. >> and pakistan? the situation in pakistan, the news media is talking about a situation during the general's takeover and many people say in pakistan it may be linked to 1971. what do you think -- what is the future of the political system in pakistan and now for the last five years or more, they have been going on. >> we had quite a bit to say about this situation yesterday, fundamentally this is an issue for pakistanis to resolve. they've got to resolve their internal political issues in a just and transparent way just to say again pakistan has an established electoral process as outlined in the constitution. that needs to be respected. we support civilian democracy in pakistan. >> just one quick one -- >> you really got a lot today.
-- taliban commander is reported dead in pakistan. the united states killed the commander in pakistan and his deputy and eight others. washington did not confirm the strike but officials say he has a great deal of blood on his hand and his death would be a significant blow to the taliban stronghold in the area. >> he was just the latest terrorist leader to die in the drone strike but such targeted killings are not without controversy particularly regarding the assassination of al qaeda leader al-awlaki in yemen in 2011. that is because he was actually a u.s. citizen born in new mexico. but there is a government memo outlining the legal justification for killing an american without a trial. however, a judge ruled the memo can stay secret and she said there is no legal way to force the justice department to make it public. now, a former assistant u.s. attorney in the eastern district of new york. before we get to the secret memo , dispense of the question that many may have: isn't it true that during war the killing of an enemy combatant regardless whether he is an american citizen or not is in
pakistan. a u.s. drone strike has killed a top taliban commander. mullah nazir was famous for denouncing pakistan's polio eradication campaign when it began several months ago. he was also responsible for orchestrating attacks across the border in afghanistan on nato and afghan security forces. a total of ten taliban were killed in that strike. >>> and back here at home, children, teachers and staff who survived the sandy hook shooting take up a familiar routine this morning. they're going back to school. parents are being reassured that the new setting is the safest school in the entire country. as the children from sandy hook elementary school ride the bus to class today, the streets leading to their new school will be lined with green ribbons. the ribbons are the color symbolic of sandy hook elementary school. people from around the world are also showing their support. some sent snowflakes with messages of love and hope that are now hanging throughout the new school. >> a great deal of thought and effort and volunteer work make this as seamless as possible. to make it really look che
bin laden might be living in a compound in pakistan. >> the intelligence case was entirely circumstantial. nobody saw osama bin laden, had a full id on him. >> how could he live for many years inside a walled compound and never leave? why would osama bin laden want to be 35 miles from islamabad? why would he want to be steps away from pakistan's equivalent of west point? did any of this make sense? >> narrator: the president called together his national security team. >> he said to his national security team in the situation room, "i want everybody to tell me what your view is, what you would do, what your recommendation is." and he got a very mixed response. i think of the people in the room, it was probably 50%, roughly, were in favor of the raid option that we ended up taking. >> narrator: only the president could make the final decision on whether to send u.s. troops into pakistan. >> he also knew that if it had gone wrong, there would not only have been dramatically negative consequences for the men he sent in, and for our country's security, but also for his own polit
in pakistan. mullah nazir was known for plotting attacks against coalition troops. his death is considered a major blow to the taliban. but it could jeopardize u.s. relations with pakistan, as well because nazir, reportedly, had a truce with that country's military. >>> and the family of a missing journalist from new hampshire now confirms that he has been kidnapped in syria. james foley and another journalist, who has not been identified, haven't been heard from since november 22nd, underscoring the risk. the u.n. now estimates that more than 60,000 people have died in syria's civil war. >>> meanwhile, back in this country, a medical helicopter has crashed in iowa overnight, killing a pilot and two nurses flying from a hospital in mason city, to pick up a patient. there's no word yet on what may have caused the crash. we'll have updates as news becomes available. >>> in las vegas, two people were able to escape the fiery plane crash you see here. the twin-engine plane actually skidded off the runway and burst into flames. but both people onboard managed to crawl out before the fire engulf
policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs overam on cnn is seen in 200 countries worldwide but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he rights a highly respected column for "the washington post" and is the editor-at-large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back to the munk debate stage, broadcaster and journalist, fareed zukaria. we are just moments from getting our debate underway but before we hear from opening statements, once again, i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together so you will see this countdown clock
service will be held tomorrow. >>> a teenager in pakistan becoming a champion of women's rights in that country. the 15-year-old left the hospital today. the heroic teenager was flown to england. her family now lives there. she was attacked by the taliban if you will remember for challenging the terrorist group's efforts to deny other rights for women. the taliban still says they will try to target her again. >>> and still ahead, mixed news on those new unemployment numbers. a little later on as we check in with the redskins. see how they are getting ready for sunday's big game against the seahawks of seattle. >>> and coming up next, a little boy gets the thrill of the young life when his favorite super hero turns out to be his all-time favorite hero. >>> if you don't have it yet, you want to be sure to download the brand new iphone app. it's got news on your fingertips and live interactive weather maps, just like the one that topper is using all for free. it is also available for the kindle fire and some other android tablets. >>> all right employment rate is still at 7.8% toni
in neighboring afghanistan. but pakistan's military considered him as key to keeping the peace in pakistan. >>> in iraq, more religous violence killed five people there. al-qaeda gunmen killed a police hand and his brother north of baghdad and a car bomb killed two shiite muslims on a pilgrimage to karbala. the government is promising tighter security for those traveling this week. >>> al-jazeera is buying an american cable chaner. the arab news channel is available on some tvs but the deal with current tv gives it a chance to broadcast to more of the country. >>> check this out. you may have a harder time finding 75-watt light bulbs. they are joining the list of incandescent bulbs being phased out for more energy efficient light bulbs. and 40 and 06-watt bulbs will be phased out by -- and 60-watt bulbs will be phased out by 2014. >>> less than a month after the school shooting in connecticut, survivors returned to class today. >> first, aid delayed. there is a crucial issue for the congress today. we are back in a moment with the details.  . >>> welcome back to fox 5 mo
served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, a former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the post and is the editor at large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back broadcaster and journalist, fareed zakaria. [applause] now we are just momenting from getting our debate under way but before we hear from opening statements, one again i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this handy clock appear. when it rea
and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements, once again, i need this audience assist answer to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remark and we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this clock appear. when it reaches zero applaud. this will let our debaters know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. before we kick off the debate let's see how the 3,000 people gathered today voted on our resolution that the world cannot tolerate iran with nuclear weapons. let's see t
died in that strike. it happened in pakistan's volatile tribal region in the province of south wazirstan. pakistani officials say the men were among 15 killed today in drone attacks. u.s. officials insists the use of unmanned aircraft with missiles is successful on to fight terrorist elements, but human rights groups says the number of civilians killed is too high. peter bergen joins us from washington. tell us about how the obama administration has relied on these drone strikes and what they've been able to accomplish. >> well, they've killed 37 leaders of al qaeda and the taliban, but they've also in the process killed hundreds of others. there's a controversy about how many civilians. i work at a foundation called the new america foundation where we track it carefully. we calculate there were five civilian deaths in 2012. that's not dissimilar to the accounts of other organizations that count these things. the civilian death toll has dropped remarkably in the last several years. in the 2004-2007 time frame it was about 60%. the reason is better intelligence, drones that fly
suddenly without warning. the drone strike which killed several militants in pakistan's rugged tribal area is causing new controversy. jill dougherty has details for us. what's going on some. >> wolf, u.s. official now is confirming the death of that key warlord. he is not saying how he died but he does say that he and his men were directly responsible for planning and carrying out cross border attacks on coalition forces in afghanistan as well as providing protection for al qaeda forces in pakistan. pakistani intelligence officials tell cnn what they believe was a u.s. drone has killed a key pakistani taliban commander in south waziristan. pakistani warlord who sent his men to afghanistan to fight u.s. and nato troops. the pentagon is not confirming his death but senior officials are calling reports that he died a major development. nazeer, they say, had a lot of blood on his hands. george little, pemt gone spokesman said, any time a bad guy has a bad day, it's a good day for us. but in pakistan, fury over the killing. a man who played both sides. >> he was one of the top commanders of th
people killed in two suspected u.s. drone attacks in a volatile region of pakistan. that commander was said to be at odds with the pakistani taliban over the peace agreement he signed with the government in 2007. as part of the deal he refused to attack pakistani military tar goats, but he is believed to be behind a number of attacks that attacked the u.s. military. two of his deputies were believed to be killed in that strike. >>> the u.n. estimates that the death toll in syria is now beyond 60,000. 15,000 higher than estimates cnn had gone with. and that number will likely continue to rise as attacks like these persist. an opposition group says 207 people were killed in war-related violence yesterday alone. most of them in damascus and suburbs, others in aleppo. cnn cannot independently verify these numbers. >>> the family of james foley, missing in syria since new year's day, is launching a public campaign to find him. global post, a news website foley published for, said he was driving to the border with turkey when he was intercepted by a car. he was forced out of the vehicle
in washington on friday. mass protests were held in islamabad, pakistan, today demanding new election reforms. thousands of supporters of an outspoken muslim cleric gathered in the capital amid heavy security. they called for an end to government inefficiency and corruption. to the south, there were funerals for many of the 86 shiites killed in last week's bombings in quetta. thousands of shiites had refused to bury the dead until the provincial government was dismissed. syrian women now cite rape as a primary reason for fleeing their war-torn country. that's according to a new report by the international rescue committee. it says women report being sexually assaulted and raped, often in public and in front of family members. the i.r.c. gathered the data by interviewing more than 240 women in refugee camps in jordan and lebanon. the u.n. has registered more than 600,000 syrian refugees. in china, the people of beijing suffered through another day of severe smog, and for the first time government officials openly acknowledged the problem. the pollution was at its worst over the weekend, keepin
for the administration on several occasions. >> rose: syria, for example. >> pakistan, syria, other places. and i suspect that president obama is not going to see in senator john kerry as much of an independent operator as we saw with, say, secretary clinton who pressed very hard with bob gates for a much more muscular expansion of the surge in afghanistan. she pressed very hard for the libya intervention. and i'm -- it's not clear to me yet that secretary kerry, if he is confirmed, would necessarily press as hard as she did on those issues. he may well surprise us on that. >> rose: she has high public marks for what she did as secretary of state. among the foreign policy people, what do they look at as her principal accomplishment? >> i think that the public marks have been a little bit higher, charlie, than what you hear from within the foreign policy community. that's usually the case in these cases. certainly when she went around the world she was a star in her own right. she certainly stood for a number of women's rights issues that are near and dear to her heart. but it was interesting out of this
on that deadly attack on aid workers in pakistan. we'll learn how a failed plan to capture osama bin laden may have led to a violent climate against innocent civilians who were only trying to help others. >>> and a new movie touching nerves and sparking controversy. we'll hear from the stars of "django unchained." a fascinating interview. >> i have not seen it yet. i hear jamie foxx is pretty good. but tarantino does not shy away from controversy. >>> children, teachers and staff take up a familiar scene this morning, they are going to school. >> parents are being reassured that the new setng is the safest school in the entire country. abc's diana perez has more on this. good morning, diana. >> reporter: rob and paula, it's been less than three weeks since the mac kerr at sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. it will be a long time before things return to normal for the children of sandy hook elementary. but in an effort to bring them one step closer, they saw their teachers again wednesday and walked through what will be their new school. >> children are coming up, so excited
commander nuruvi nazier. it happened near the afghanistan/pakistan border. the senior commander was among nine people killed in a missile strike on a house. he was responsible for several attacks against u.s. troops in afghanistan. however, he had a truce with the pakistani military. it is hard to independently verify his death at this point. the u.s. rarely comments on its secretive drone program. >>> five minutes after the hour now. new this morning, president obama signed the deal to limit the damage caused by going off the fiscal cliff. he signed it overnight in hawaii where he resumed his winter vacation. the measure prevents taxes from going up for 98% of americans. it also extends long-term unemployment benefits for millions of people who are out of work. spending cuts which were supposed to take effect have been deferred, though, for two months. >>> the legislation could save some metro riders hundreds of dollars a year. riders who put aside pretax income to pay for their commute can now put aside $240 a month. that cap was reduced to $125 a month last year. metro says the lower t
in northwest pakistan. the taliban attacked malala leaving school. the terror group targeted the teenager because she openly challenged the taliban's efforts to deny education and other rights to women. malala was flown to queen elizabeth hospital in birmingham which has treated hundreds of soldiers injured in the wars in afghanistan and iraq. malala will continue to come to this hospital for outpatient therapy. in a few weeks from now she'll be readmitted here for reconstructive surgery on her head. malala will continue her recovery with her parents and two brothers who have moved to central england. this week her father was given a three year diplomatic post in britain. more than 250,000 people have signed online petitions calling for malala to be nominated for a nobel peace prize. the taliban has vowed to target her again. rita nissan for cbs news, birmingham, england. >> taliban gunmen attacked more women this week. they shot and killed five teachers riding in a van in the same part of pakistan where malala was shot. >>> gabrielle giffords is paying a visit to newtown, connecticut. pl
' education in her native pakistan. it is remarkable, though, and very heartwarming, isn't it, to see these images of malala, the 15-year-old girl, walking away almost unaided, holding the hand of a nurse, in the hospital. she even had the strength to wave to the staff that has been looking after her over the course of the past three months or so since she was evacuated from pakistan with the terrible head injuries. she's going to be located at her temporary home. her family have moved over from pakistan to birmingham in central england near to the hospital. she's going to be going back with her father and mother and two younger brothers. the doctors at the hospital say that will be best for her, but she'll still come back and forth from the hospital to get clinical treatment and she'll also have to be re-admitted according to the hospital as well for cranial reconstruction surgery. her skull was obviously smashed by the bullet that was fired into her head by the taliban gunmen back in october and she still has to undergo a lot of surgery to, you know, kind of make that damage good, s
was shot pakistan last october. the taliban targeted her because of stopping young girls from getting education . we wish her all of the best. and there is a movement brewing in texas to get the state to secede from the u.s.. there is it a petition on the white house website that received 124,000 signatures since president obama's reelection. has the fiscal cliff helped thrertheir cause. joining us is it the texas national move the group pushing for secession. tell us why it is it time for texas to secede from the union? >> well, uma, there is it a lot of reasons that we believe that texas should leave the union. but basically it boils down to political freedom that we have loss. cultural freedom and certainly the economy that you have been talking about on your show for the last 45 minutes. there is it 16 trillion rein it is right there and with the negotiations that went on last weekend, we add 4. something trilion. we have 20 trillion reasons to try to protect the economy and people of texas from what we believe is it a certain coming disaster. >> and you folks are leading a seriou
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 133 (some duplicates have been removed)